Why You Should Care About More Than Page Views For Your Press Releases

When it comes to measuring the success of your press releases, it’s often a bit tricky, but there are numerous metrics you can look at. From counting how many reporters actually covered the story to seeing how many interactions it received to monitoring traffic to your website, there are countless useful figures you can use to gauge the value of your press release. However, there is one press release metric that I find to be a little misleading and slightly overrated – page views.

Vector modern numeric scoreboard set.Look, I get my page views are an enamoring statistic. You want a lot of people to see your press release and read your story. After all, if nobody reads your story, how are you going to get your message out? You need eyes on your story, there’s no doubt about it. But the problem is that page views don’t tell the full story.

Let’s say you distribute a press release and it gets 5,000 views. Pretty good, right? That’s 5,000 people who were exposed to your brand and your message. Not too shabby. But here’s the thing. How many of those 5,000 viewers are part of your target audience?

See, the real way to get value out of a press release is to get your story in front of your target audience. If the story is product-driven, you want current and potential customer to be viewing the press release. If it’s more about your financials, you’ll want those views to be coming from investors.

And that’s why page views come up short as a useful metric. It tells you how many people are looking at your story but not who is looking at your press release. For all you know, you could be completely missing the mark with your distribution, and your press releases could be getting those views from people with no interest in your company or products. Heck, those page views might even be coming from spambots.

So, rather than focusing just on the page views your press releases get, try to dig deeper to determine how effective your press releases really are. That means looking at how much traffic your stories are driving to your website, how those visitors behave on your website, how many shares your stories get, how effective they are at reaching your audience, and so on. This is the kind of information that will help you calculate the real ROI of your press releases.


What metrics do you look at when measuring the success of your press releases? Let us know by commenting below.

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (, the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download Five (5) Free PR and Press Release eBooks ($67 Value) here:

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