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Can You Actually Be Creative With Press Releases?

Press releases are like freshwater aquariums: if you’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all. Occasionally they do come in different shapes or sizes and the fish vary, but inevitably when someone asks you to see their freshwater aquarium you just roll your eyes in mock anticipation.

Is it even possible anymore to have a creative and unique press release? Something that truly shines through and wows everyone who reads it? I contend that it is indeed possible, although it takes knowing yourself and the company a little more than some are willing to do. This sounds mysterious but I promise it will make sense as you read on.

Your Unique Take

One of the most important things you can apply to your press release (and every piece of writing associated with your business) is your unique perspective. You know your business and products, you know why they work and can benefit humanity, so you’re the best person to tell everyone else.

I’m sure you’ve heard of the adage “nothing new under the sun.” It’s generously passed around to writers remind them that telling a new story is impossible because every single one of them has been used countless times before.

The problem with this is each story IS unique – it just all depends on who is telling the story. Your perspective gives the press release the “oomph” it needs to be special.

A press release about the launch of a new treadmill is one thing. If it’s YOUR treadmill, though, you know why it’s the best thing since sliced gluten-free bread. That’s what makes the press release – your story – new, fresh, and exciting.

Nu-Creativity 

Press releases aren’t just for the local newspaper anymore. Even if one does end up going to the Local Gazette it will undoubtedly end up on the Internet as well. This gives you a creative edge you can fully take advantage of.

Ever since the world wide web caught on in the early 90s, the Internet has focused less on text and more on everything else. This includes, video, audio, pictures, and even interactive tools and widgets – all of which you can use in your press releases.

Of course you don’t want to overdo it, but a little color here and there can really draw readers’ attention. You may even win over some of those stalwarts who hate reading anything on the web that looks like a press release. Many feel they’re a needless holdover from the newspaper area ,but they may pay attention if you really grab them.

So sprinkle some pictures and some good, relevant links around your press release to take full advantage of what the web has to offer. However, make sure you’re not doing so at expense of your writing, as the meat of the press release is still the most important thing. If you don’t have a strong message, all the pictures, links and videos in the world won’t save you.

What was the most creative press release you ever put out?

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download a free copy of the PR Checklist – a 24 point list of Press Release Dos and Don’ts here: http://www.ereleases.com/prchecklist.html

One Response

  1. Nick Wright says:

    We tested press releases from business and government agencies by running them through the StyleWriter copy-editing software. Most were poorly written, some were dreadful. So if you have something to say, it is worth saying it as clearly as possible. This usually means writing in plain English.

    The software edits you the way a subeditor on a paper would – and they are the people who edit your writing. Here’s a simple example from the article above.

    “The problem with this is each story is unique – it just all depends on who is telling the story.”

    “But each story is unique – it just depends on who’s telling the story.”

    If you can write the way journalists write – even with the help of software – your press releases will get more coverage.

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