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5 Reasons to Use an Infographic as a Press Release

People have been declaring the press release dead for a while now, and while I don’t agree with that assessment, I also think it’s time to push the boundaries of what a press release can be. These days, there are social media press releases, press releases with video embedded, and a range of other variations on the traditional press release.

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landscape_leadership/5451695738/

One of my favorite current press release variations is the infographic. Infographics have been the rage online for a few years now. You see them everywhere. Just go the Digg or ReddIt, and chances are, one of the top stories contains an infographic.

In case you don’t know, infographics are visual representations of information or data. Here’s an example of an infographic that shows the differences in government vs. private sector compensation.

Why are infographics so effective? And why should you consider doing a press release in infographic style?

1. Infographics clearly explain even the most complex issues – A lot of people are visual learners. So, combining text with compelling imagery can be helpful for getting your point across more effectively. It also makes your story just look more interesting.

2. Infographics stand out from traditional press releases – Reporters are bombarded with press releases all day long. Most of them look and sound the exact same. By sending an infographic rather than a traditional press release, you give yourself a much better chance of standing out and capturing the reporter’s attention.

3. People love sharing infographics – Because they’re so easy to understand and fun to look at, infographics tend to be great for linkbait and viral marketing. People love sharing them. So, post your infographic online, promote the heck out of it, and see how much traffic you can drive.

4. Infographics can be read quickly – Reporters (and everyone else for that matter) are always pressed for time. They just don’t have time to read every press release carefully, word for word. Infographics appeal to their inclination to scan, allowing them to quickly look over it without missing anything important.

5. Infographics give reporters details they can use to fill out their story – Infographics usually contain a range of interesting facts and figures. This is the type of information reporters typically look for when putting together a story, so you’re helping them out.

Have you ever used an infographic as a press release? Was it successful?

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download your free copy of the Beginner’s Guide to Writing Powerful Press Releases here: http://www.ereleases.com/insider/beginnersguide.html

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4 Responses

  1. [...] E Releases discuss in a recent article the fact that companies have been pushing the boundaries of what a press release is for years now, and rightfully so. Some releases have had videos added to them, and some are formatted to fit the different social media outlets. Companies need to change the traditional press release sometimes to reach a different type of audience. [...]

  2. Rhianna Thompson says:

    Insightful article. I think that infographics are brilliant for conveying statistics and making them more eye catching and memorable. However,I think that a traditional press release will always be a better option when you need a more descriptive content.

    Infographics would be uneccessary if you were writing about a the opening or launch of a new restaurant or product For this, I think that a more descriptive content would be needed rather than just brief facts, figures, images and bullet points.

  3. Lauren Hersh says:

    Info graphics have long been used as visuals for press conferences to assist in getting dense info into visual “bites” especially for the TV cameras, which guaranteed your message would be delivered to the public. In pre-digital days, I would also provide a hard copy in the press packet. While I rely on personal contact with several well-placed journalists more than press releases, this may be something I would try as an addition to a press release if the content would lend itself to a info graphic.

  4. [...] E Releases discuss in a recent article the fact that companies have been pushing the boundaries of what a press release is for years now, and rightfully so. Some releases have had videos added to them, and some are formatted to fit the different social media outlets. Companies need to change the traditional press release sometimes to reach a different type of audience. [...]

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