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What to Include in the ‘Notes to the Editor’ Section of Your Press Release

One of the common components of a press release is the “Notes to the Editor” section at the very end. This is the section where you can provide a bit of background information for the reporter. It’s typically boilerplate information that doesn’t belong in the story but that lets the reporter know a little bit more about who you are, what you company does, what your background is, etc.

Now, if you’re not careful, this section can go to waste, or you could cram it with so much information that it’s overwhelming and the reporter just ignores it. Remember the basic rule of press releases — reporters are busy, so get to the point. The same rule still applies to the “Notes to the Editor” section. You have to include the right elements, but you must take care not to go overboard and turn this section into a novel.

So, what needs to be included in the “Notes to the Editor” section of your press release? It varies according to the company and the situation, but some of the things you might want to include are as follows:

  • Information about your company — Include a few sentences about your company, including information about when you were founded, what you do, what your main products/services are, where you’re located, and what awards/recognition you’ve received. Think of this as an abridged version of the About Us page on your website.
  • Information about other organizations referred to in the press release — For example, if your press release is announcing a partnership with another organization or if it’s announcing that you’ll be presenting at an industry conference, you’d want to include more information about your new partner or the conference you’re presenting at. It’s all about giving the reporter good background information they can pull from when writing their story.
  • Details on documents or studies referenced in the press release — If you reference any studies or statistics in your press release, it might be wise to include information about your sources, such as the name of the publication, in the “Notes to the Editor” section.
  • Your contact information — Include the name, job title, and contact information (phone, email, etc.) for the individual that the media can contact for more information. This is a must. Every press release should include contact information on it.

What are some other things you include in the “Notes to the Editor” section in your press releases?

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download your free copy of 7 Cheap PR Tactics for Success in Any Economy here: http://www.ereleases.com/7cheaptactics.html

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