PR Fuel - Public Relations News & PR Tips http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel PR Fuel: PR News, Views, & Stews Wed, 23 Apr 2014 10:30:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.7.1 The 5 Things You Can Do To Get Ahead In Your PR Career http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/5-things-can-get-ahead-pr-career/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/5-things-can-get-ahead-pr-career/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 10:30:14 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9637 Public relations can be a cutthroat field. Competition for jobs is always fierce, and standing out from a sea of candidates can be incredibly challenging. But take it from someone who has been in this industry for more years than I can remember at this point, you can be successful in PR and you can […]

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Public relations can be a cutthroat field. Competition for jobs is always fierce, and standing out from a sea of candidates can be incredibly challenging. But take it from someone who has been in this industry for more years than I can remember at this point, you can be successful in PR and you can get ahead in your career. It all starts with doing these 5 things:

 

  1. Progress ConceptConsume as much information as you can—I still spend time every day reading and learning as much as I can about the current state of PR. You need to have a voracious appetite for information. Set aside 30 minutes every day just to read PR blogs and books. The more you learn on your own, the less you’ll have to learn on the job, and the more valuable you’ll be as a job candidate.
  2. Build your personal brand online—Employers want people who have a demonstrated knowledge in digital platforms. It’s one thing to tell a potential employer that you have a good understanding of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, blogging, etc., but it really adds credibility if you can show them you have a strong online presence. Focus on building up your reputation online. That’s how you’ll establish yourself as an expert who has something to offer.
  3. Network, network, network—There’s some truth to the phrase, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” You can be absolutely brilliant at PR, but if you have no connections, you’re never going to get ahead in your career. You need to cultivate relationships with people who can help you grow in your career.
  4. Create a cover letter and resume that stand out—Take an honest look at your resume and the cover letters you send out when applying for jobs. Do you really believe they stand out from potentially hundreds of other resumes and cover letters? Think of it like pitching a reporter. What’s your hook? What makes you different?
  5. Follow up every interview with a thank you note—Most job candidates who get an interview simply go to the interview and wait with their fingers crossed, hoping to hear back from the employer. Screw that! Be proactive. After every interview, send the employer a thank you note. It can be handwritten or an email. It doesn’t really matter. The point is that you’ll be making a strong impression and ensuring you stay atop the employer’s mind.

 

If you commit to doing these 5 things, you will find success in PR. It might not be easy, but nothing worth having ever is, right?

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download a free copy of Grammar Geek’s Guide to Writing Press Releases here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/grammar.html

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Do These Things After You’ve Received Media Coverage http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/things-youve-received-media-coverage/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/things-youve-received-media-coverage/#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 10:30:12 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9628 You spend a lot of time and money trying to get earned media. It’s a never-ending war filled with constant defeats in battle. But when you finally do receive positive media coverage, it’s a great feeling, right? What a lot of people don’t realize, however, is that your work isn’t finished. Now, you need to […]

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You spend a lot of time and money trying to get earned media. It’s a never-ending war filled with constant defeats in battle. But when you finally do receive positive media coverage, it’s a great feeling, right? What a lot of people don’t realize, however, is that your work isn’t finished. Now, you need to capitalize on your coverage to squeeze as much out of it as you can.

newspapers showing extra extra messageOnce you’ve received press coverage, do these things:

 

  • Share the heck out of the story—Mission #1 is to drive as much traffic to the story as possible, and one of the best ways to do that is by sharing it with your fans and followers on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, and any other social networking sites you might be a member of. Make sure to share the story at different times to help make sure as many people see it as possible.
  • Link to it in your news room—In my list of 9 things to include in your news room, “links to media coverage” was #7. Including links to any stories you’ve been featured in helps increase your credibility and it also provides other reporters with valuable resources to work with in the future.
  • Blog about it—A complementary blog post is always a good idea whenever you earn media coverage. You can provide an overview of the story with a link to it and maybe even include any information that got left out.
  • Track the spread of the story—Once you get press coverage, there’s a good chance that other outlets might pick up the story and run with it. People will also likely be sharing the story across social media. Track the spread of the story so that you can get a better idea of how much of an impact the initial coverage is really making.
  • Follow up with the reporter, but don’t become a pest—Don’t just ignore the reporter who covers your company. Follow up to help keep the relationship growing. Let the reporter know what you’ve been doing to promote the story, and of course, thank him or her for their coverage. This reporter could likely become a very important contact for you going forward, but a word of caution: don’t become a pest. Don’t bombard the reporter with pitches on a daily basis, especially irrelevant ones. You don’t want to blow this opportunity to become a go-to source.

 

Is there anything else you’d add to this list? Share your thoughts by leaving a comment below.

 

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Grab your free 160-page copy of the Big Press Release Book – Press Releases for Every Occasion and Industry here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/bigbook.html

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There’s Nothing Wrong with Admitting You’re Wrong http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/theres-nothing-wrong-admitting-youre-wrong/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/theres-nothing-wrong-admitting-youre-wrong/#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 10:30:55 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9619 I’m not going to lie. I have a hard time admitting when I’m wrong. But I’m not alone. Most people don’t like admitting they’re wrong. Pride is a tough thing to swallow, and we’ll go to any lengths to justify our mistakes and to pass the blame to someone else. The problem is that this […]

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I’m not going to lie. I have a hard time admitting when I’m wrong. But I’m not alone. Most people don’t like admitting they’re wrong. Pride is a tough thing to swallow, and we’ll go to any lengths to justify our mistakes and to pass the blame to someone else.

oops_signThe problem is that this doesn’t fly in business. If your company makes mistakes and doesn’t admit them and apologize for them, you’re going to lose customers, employees, the respect of the media…you’re going to lose everything.

The fact is that admitting your mistakes isn’t a weakness. In fact, owning your mistakes can actually help your business grow and gain favor with your audience. Here’s how:

 

  • Every mistake gives you a chance to learn—Whenever you screw up, you have a great opportunity to learn what you did wrong and to make the necessary changes to improve and ensure it never happens again. It’s important that you have a plan for change and that you outline that plan whenever apologizing for your mistakes so that your audience will have a reason to trust you again going forward.
  • People want to forgive—The truth is that America is a forgiving nation. People are forgiving by nature. You can earn the forgiveness and respect of your customers, but you have to be willing to admit you’re wrong and to issue a sincere apology. Sincere is the key word here. Your audience will know if your apology is canned and forced. Be yourself and let your honesty shine through in your apology.
  • Admitting mistakes humanizes your company—Consumers are more skeptical of companies than ever before, and for good reason. Time and time again, companies treat consumers poorly, employ shady tactics, and just don’t act in a decent manner. That’s why it’s so important to humanize your company…to give customers something they can connect with and trust. Admitting your mistakes and sincerely apologizing humanizes your brand and can be helpful in growing relationships with your customers.

 

Do you have a hard time admitting you’re wrong? Has it hurt your business? Share your experiences by commenting below!

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download your free copy of 8 Shocking Secrets Press Release Distribution Firms Don’t Want You to Know here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/8shockingsecrets.html

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How to Make Your Press Releases Live Longer than Just a Day http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/make-press-releases-live-longer-just-day/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/make-press-releases-live-longer-just-day/#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 10:30:13 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9607 Tell me if this situation sounds familiar: You write a press release, send it out to reporters and distribute it online, and then, a day later, you’re on to something else. It’s like the press release was only alive for a day. It’s kind of sad when you think about it. You put in all […]

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Tell me if this situation sounds familiar: You write a press release, send it out to reporters and distribute it online, and then, a day later, you’re on to something else. It’s like the press release was only alive for a day. It’s kind of sad when you think about it. You put in all this work, and your press release gets forgotten in no time at all.

measuring_tapeThankfully, it doesn’t have to be this way. Your press releases can live longer than just a day. Check out these life-extending tips for press releases:

 

  • Write a blog post about your news—Your blog is a great channel for distributing news. I’ve always believed it’s a good idea to write a corresponding blog post for every press release that you send out. It puts your story in front of more people, and it helps your press release live a little longer. You could send out your press release on a Monday, and on Tuesday, publish a corresponding blog post that includes snippets from the release and even a link to it.
  • Share it in your newsletter—Every business should have a strong email list. One recent survey found that email marketing is nearly 40 times more effective than Facebook and Twitter combined. Email is also a great tool for sharing news with your audience. You can give an overview of your latest news in your newsletter and include links to your full press releases.
  • Post it across your social media accounts (on different days)—Want to get as many eyes on your story as possible? Promote it on social media. If you’re active on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, or any other social site, make sure you link out to your press releases whenever you publish them. And do it on different days and with different descriptions. For instance, on Monday, you might send out a Tweet with the press release headline and a link. On Tuesday, you might make a Facebook post with an interesting quote from the press release and a link. This helps you sustain interest over a longer period of time than simply blasting everything out all at once.

 

What are some other tips to make press releases stay alive longer? Share your best advice by commenting below. 

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download How to Get Your Company Covered on Top Blogs here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/blogs.html

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Why You Need to Highlight Your Expertise when Responding to HARO Queries http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/need-highlight-expertise-responding-haro-queries/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/need-highlight-expertise-responding-haro-queries/#comments Tue, 15 Apr 2014 10:30:14 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9595 Three times a day, HARO emails its subscribers a list with dozens of the latest free media opportunities from reporters in various fields who need sources for their stories. Without a doubt, HARO is one of the best PR resources out there, and it’s totally free. Just sign up, and you’ll start getting fresh media […]

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Three times a day, HARO emails its subscribers a list with dozens of the latest free media opportunities from reporters in various fields who need sources for their stories. Without a doubt, HARO is one of the best PR resources out there, and it’s totally free. Just sign up, and you’ll start getting fresh media opportunities delivered to you three times daily Monday through Friday.

EThe great thing about HARO is that it’s filled with reporters looking for people like you to quote in their stories. The bad thing is that there are thousands of other people just like you responding to the queries and trying to win the coverage that you want so badly.

That’s why it’s so important that you do everything you can to make your pitch stand out from the rest. In the past, I’ve offered a number of tips for responding to HARO queries, but today, I want to focus on one point in particular: showing your expertise.

Here’s the thing. The reporters you’re responding to probably don’t know you. That’s why they’re using HARO, because they don’t have the sources they need. Your job is to show the reporter that you’re the perfect source for their story.

The fact is that reporters aren’t going to quote just any random person in their story. The quality of their article depends largely on having a credible source. It’s your responsibility to highlight your expertise and to demonstrate your credibility so the reporter knows that you’re a good source.

The other thing to remember is that reporters who use HARO are typically in a bit of a hurry. They’re trying to meet a tight deadline to get their stories out. That means they don’t have time to go back and forth with you to figure out whether or not you’re a credible source. It needs to be clear in your initial response that you have the qualifications and knowledge to be their source.

When you respond to HARO queries, remember to:

 

  • Briefly summarize your experience and qualifications
  • Include a link to your website
  • Edit and proofread your response to ensure it’s well crafted and creates a strong first impression

 

What are some of your best tips for responding to HARO queries? Let us know by commenting below. 

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download your free copy of 7 Cheap PR Tactics for Success in Any Economy here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/7cheaptactics.html

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Why You Should Still Try To Get Print Media Coverage http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/still-try-get-print-media-coverage/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/still-try-get-print-media-coverage/#comments Mon, 14 Apr 2014 10:30:12 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9580 Because most people tend to get their news online these days, most PR people have shifted their efforts from getting coverage in traditional newspapers and magazines to getting coverage on blogs and relevant websites. And while there are certainly many advantages to targeting online publications (e.g. you can reach a wider audience, drive traffic to […]

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Because most people tend to get their news online these days, most PR people have shifted their efforts from getting coverage in traditional newspapers and magazines to getting coverage on blogs and relevant websites. And while there are certainly many advantages to targeting online publications (e.g. you can reach a wider audience, drive traffic to your website, build links, target way more publications, etc.) that doesn’t mean you should neglect print media altogether. Print isn’t dead, and great opportunities still exist for spreading your message.

 

newspapers showing extra extra messageTargeting print publications offers some important advantages:

 

  • Get more in-depth coverage—Often times, print publications tend to provide longer, more detailed articles than you find online. That’s because the computer screen (or phone screen) just isn’t designed for long-form reading. Multiple studies have shown that people read content online differently than they do in print. Online, people tend to scan content quickly. In print, they’re likelier to read it word for word. As a result, print publications can get away with doing longer, in-depth stories, and this gives you the opportunity to get more robust coverage.
  • Make a lasting impact with readers—Because people tend to read print content more thoroughly and carefully than online content, your print stories could have a more lasting impact on your audience. Also, the shelf life of an online article isn’t always that long. New content is being published online by the second, competing for the attention of your audience. A magazine or newspaper, on the other hand, can often stick around on a person’s desk or coffee table for days, months, or even years, giving your story some true lasting power.
  • Build trust—There’s something about print media that’s just inherently credible. When you read something in a newspaper or reputable magazine, you know that it was fact-checked and that it’s accurate. That’s not always the case with a blog post. Therefore, earned media coverage in print can go a long way to increasing your trustworthiness with your target audience.

 

What do you think? Is it still worth going after print media opportunities? Or should PR people just focus their efforts online? Share your thoughts by commenting below. 

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Grab your free 160-page copy of the Big Press Release Book – Press Releases for Every Occasion and Industry here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/bigbook.html

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Commenting on Journalists’ Stories to Build Relationships http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/commenting-journalists-stories-build-relationships/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/commenting-journalists-stories-build-relationships/#comments Fri, 11 Apr 2014 10:30:53 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9574 Getting the attention of a reporter can be pretty tough. You can send an email, but chances are that the reporter is receiving countless emails day and night, so yours very well may get overlooked. You can give the reporter a call, but he (or she) is probably up against a deadline and if he […]

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Getting the attention of a reporter can be pretty tough. You can send an email, but chances are that the reporter is receiving countless emails day and night, so yours very well may get overlooked. You can give the reporter a call, but he (or she) is probably up against a deadline and if he doesn’t already know you he might not have time to chat. You can try to interact with the reporter on Twitter (something I highly recommend), but even still, it can often be tough to stand out in the Twittersphere if that’s the only way you’re reaching out. There is, however, one place where you’re almost certain to get a reporter’s attention, especially if you’re there frequently over time – the comment section on his stories.

Comment button and hand cursorIn this age of digital journalism, one of the most common ways a reporter’s success (and sometimes, income) is measured is by the amount of traffic and attention his articles generate. So, many reporters pay very close attention to the comments readers leave on their stories. They want to keep readers engaged and coming back, so they give readers the ability to comment and they interact with them, building relationships.

For a PR person, this represents an opportunity to get noticed and establish a relationship with a particular journalist. Here’s how you can do it:

 

  • Choose a reporter who covers your industry.
  • Read every story he publishes.
  • Comment on at least one of his articles or blog posts every week. The key here is to leave insightful comments that promote discussion. Don’t say things like “Great post!” or “I agree!” Those are meaningless comments that won’t get noticed. Add something to the story. Share your unique perspective. It’s even okay to disagree with the reporter if you do it in a respectful and thoughtful manner.
  • Keep doing this so you can get noticed and start building a relationship with the reporter.
  • Don’t pitch too early. This is about earning trust, and that takes time. You don’t want to come in immediately pitching yourself and asking for favors. Let the relationship build. Take your time. If the reporter sees you’re adding value to the conversations and have a unique point of view, he may reach out to you first.

 

The other great thing about this approach is that it helps you get more familiar with the reporter’s work. You can get a better feel for what topics he covers, what his audience is most interested in, and where you might be able to fit in at some point down the line.

Have you tried to connect with reporters by commenting on their articles? How did it work out for you? Leave a comment to share your thoughts and experiences!

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download Five (5) Free PR and Press Release eBooks ($67 Value) here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/bundle.html

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Don’t Let Roboquotes Ruin Your Press Releases http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/dont-let-roboquotes-ruin-press-releases/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/dont-let-roboquotes-ruin-press-releases/#comments Thu, 10 Apr 2014 10:30:37 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9565 When was the last time you read a quote in a press release that really made you say, “Wow, that was really interesting and insightful”? It’s been a while, hasn’t it? That’s because most executive quotes in press releases suck. They’re what I like to call roboquotes. They read like they came straight out of […]

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When was the last time you read a quote in a press release that really made you say, “Wow, that was really interesting and insightful”? It’s been a while, hasn’t it? That’s because most executive quotes in press releases suck. They’re what I like to call roboquotes. They read like they came straight out of the mouth of a robot. I can’t stand it!mic_on_the_air

The sad part is that roboquotes are a huge waste of a great opportunity. Remember, a quote is attributed to a person, not an organization. That means it’s okay for that person to have an opinion and to communicate a message in a subjective way (just avoid the hyperbole). That also means it’s okay for the person to show a little personality.

Here’s what a great executive quote should do:

 

  • Add something to the story—Too often, the executive quote is nothing more than a rephrasing of what was already said in the first paragraph of the press release. It’s a waste of space! A good quote should add something that the reader didn’t already know. It should bring some context to the story.
  • Show personality—Roboquotes make the person and the organization they’re representing seem stiff and boring. Reporters want to see good quotes they can use to add life to their story. Inject your personality. Use colorful, interesting language that showcases your sense of individuality. These are the types of quotes that will get noticed and that will help establish your brand.
  • Be subjective—No, I’m not saying you should say something like, “This is the greatest product in the history of the world!” However, it’s perfectly acceptable to be subjective in your executive quote. For example, in this Apple press release from 2011, Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior VP of Worldwide Product Marketing said, “iPhone 4S is a hit with customers around the world, and together with iOS 5 and iCloud, is the best iPhone ever.” That last part is subjective, and that’s okay, because it’s a quote.

 

A few tips to help you out when you’re crafting your executive quotes for your press releases:

 

  • Be bold and provocative.
  • Have a personality.
  • Share an anecdote to harness the power of storytelling.
  • Offer a unique viewpoint that the reader might not have thought about.

 

Take a look at your recent press releases. Are they filled with roboquotes?

 

 

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download your free copy of 8 Shocking Secrets Press Release Distribution Firms Don’t Want You to Know here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/8shockingsecrets.html

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Should You Still Be Putting Keywords In Your Press Release Headlines? http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/still-putting-keywords-press-release-headlines/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/still-putting-keywords-press-release-headlines/#comments Wed, 09 Apr 2014 10:30:27 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9556 We all know that SEO has evolved drastically over the past year or so. What once worked no longer works today, and if you don’t adapt, you run the risk of damaging your online presence. Simply put, the traditional SEO press release is dead. The days of stuffing your press releases with keywords and keyword-rich […]

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We all know that SEO has evolved drastically over the past year or so. What once worked no longer works today, and if you don’t adapt, you run the risk of damaging your online presence. Simply put, the traditional SEO press release is dead. The days of stuffing your press releases with keywords and keyword-rich anchor text to drive up your search rankings are long gone. If you’re still doing those things, you need to stop…now. But does that mean that we should ignore SEO altogether when writing press releases? For example, should you stop including keywords in the headlines of your press releases?

Big question markThe answer: yes and no.

Let me explain.

Google is making it harder for you to determine which exact keywords are driving traffic to your website. Now, you can’t see what people are searching in order to arrive at your website. On the surface, this is a move to make searches more secure, but it also signals an important shift in Google’s approach to ranking websites. No longer is it all about exact match keywords. These days, Google is focused on larger topics and user intent. Rather than returning results that contain the exact keywords the user entered into the search engine, Google is trying to instead return results that are more relevant to what the person is really searching for.

What does this mean for you? It means you don’t need to worry so much about finding the perfect keyword to target. You don’t need to obsess over which keyword to include in your headline.

Now that doesn’t mean you should be ignoring keywords altogether. They do still help Google classify your content accordingly. But for example, an automotive parts dealer doesn’t need to stress over whether he should target “car parts” or “auto parts” or “automotive parts” anymore. As long as he’s using phrases that are on topic, he should be fine.

When it comes to writing headlines, you don’t need to force a keyword in there if it doesn’t fit naturally. And you don’t need to stress out over which phrase to include. Just try to be clear and on topic, and Google should be able to index it properly.

 

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download your free copy of 7 Cheap PR Tactics for Success in Any Economy here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/7cheaptactics.html

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Why You Shouldn’t Use Typographic Emphasis In Your Press Releases http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/shouldnt-use-typographic-emphasis-press-releases/ http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/shouldnt-use-typographic-emphasis-press-releases/#comments Tue, 08 Apr 2014 10:30:16 +0000 http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/?p=9547 Doesn’t this sentence look super important? What about this one? And this one might be the most important of all! Okay, so that paragraph looks a little ridiculous, but believe it or not, I’ve seen press releases that look fairly similar. Typographic emphasis can certainly be a powerful tool in certain situations. Used sparingly in […]

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Doesn’t this sentence look super important? What about this one? And this one might be the most important of all!

stop_signOkay, so that paragraph looks a little ridiculous, but believe it or not, I’ve seen press releases that look fairly similar. Typographic emphasis can certainly be a powerful tool in certain situations. Used sparingly in a blog post, landing page, or email, emphasis can help you draw attention to important parts of your message. It can make your text easier to scan which is especially important online where people tend to scan text rather than read it word for word.

However, typographic emphasis doesn’t have a place in press releases. Here’s why:

  • It looks spammy. A press release isn’t a sales message, so when you emphasize certain portions of text, it makes your press release look like an advertisement…like spam.
  • A good story stands on its own. A well-written press release is tight and to the point. Every word should matter and should contribute to the story. There shouldn’t be a need to use emphasis to highlight key portions of text because it all should be important.
  • When you overuse typographic emphasis, it loses its importance. One of the biggest problems with typographic emphasis is that people tend to go overboard with it. You end up with something that looks like the first paragraph of this post. And when you try to make too many things stand out, nothing stands out.

So, do you agree that typographic emphasis has no place in press releases? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download Five (5) Free PR and Press Release eBooks ($67 Value) here: http://www.ereleases.com/offer/bundle.html

The post Why You Shouldn’t Use Typographic Emphasis In Your Press Releases appeared first on PR Fuel - Public Relations News & PR Tips.

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