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Break Free from the Basic Press Release Template

Have you noticed how at least 90% of press releases are pretty much the exact same? Sure, the company name is different and the buzzwords might vary, but overall, nearly every press release reads the exact same. They’re written in the same style, and there’s really nothing that makes one stand out from any of the others.

It’s template writing at its very worst. It’s like every company is using the exact same press release template, and whenever they have a new story, they plug in a few details into the same old template and, just like that, they have a new press release.

Don’t know what I’m talking about? Here’s a basic overview of the press release template I keep seeing.

ABC Company Announces (Insert Some BS Nobody Cares About)

Elaborate a little more on the BS nobody cares about. Pretty much, just rephrase your headline and pretend you’re adding to the story.

CITY, State, Date – ABC Company, a leader in (insert buzzwords here), recently announced (insert BS here). (Talk some more about how important your company is, and use plenty of buzzwords like best of breed, next generation, integrated, value-added, infrastructure, state of the art, etc.).

Insert a lifeless, pointless quote from a company executive here. Convince yourself it’s okay to be self-promotional and full of hype because it’s a quote”

…..

 

You get the idea. And you’ve probably seen a million press releases that follow this same pattern. Heck, you may have even started writing them like this yourself because you’ve gotten so familiar with the press release template.

Stop.

I say it’s time to break free from the press release template. Change things up. Try being a little creative (don’t take that advice too far), and don’t write like everyone else.

That isn’t to say you need to avoid the press release basics. Yes, your headline still needs to capture the essence of your story and hook readers in, and yes, your first paragraph should still contain the who, what, when, where, why, and how information. And above all else, your press releases need to be clear and to the point. But there’s a way to do this without it reading like every other press release being sent out right now.

The main advantage of breaking free from the press release template is that you have a better chance of catching your reader’s attention. Think about it. Reporters (or bloggers, podcasters, etc.) receive dozens of press releases every single day. Most times, they glance at the press release for a few seconds, and toss it.

Why is that? I think it’s mostly because all press releases look the exact same, and as a result, the reporter just doesn’t get motivated by the same old, same old.

By stepping out of the box and writing your own style of press releases, you have a better chance of making the reporter take notice of your story.

What do you do to make your press releases stand out?

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Grab your free 160-page copy of the Big Press Release Book – Press Releases for Every Occasion and Industry here: http://www.ereleases.com/insider/bigbook.html


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3 Responses

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Maggie Holben, Will Sears, Solo Dove, Ozelle Martin, PR Jobs and others. PR Jobs said: Break Free from the Basic Press Release Template http://ow.ly/22y7G #pr RT @ereleases [...]

  2. Dave K says:

    Great Idea. But for the life of me I cannot think of an example of how I would do it differently. Can you give and example or do you have any to share? Thanks

  3. [...] “Break Free from the Basic Press Release Template” by Mickie Kennedy (@ereleases) [...]

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