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Don’t Post Anything That Would Make Your Mom Cry

Many words have been spoken (and typed) about what kind of content you want out on the Internet to represent your company. One of the most steadfast rules is that you never want to insult your audience. Making them feel uncomfortable is easily one of the worst things you can do, as it associates your business with bad feelings.

How do you judge exactly what is a good and bad message, though? Sometimes you may think what you’re saying is perfectly innocuous, but in actuality it offended several people. Is there any way to get an idea of what might cause your customers to frown and click “unfriend?”

Your Mom

Yes, your mom. What would happen if you sent out a Facebook message that was borderline offensive and your mom saw it? She would probably cry. Or get mad. Or worse, call you up and tell you she’s (gasp) disappointed in you!

Now, imagine all your customers are clones of your mother. Suddenly, everything you post becomes a huge ordeal. Will she be upset if I say this? If I try to bait and switch, will she call me up and cry into my ear about all the ways I went wrong?

Even the most innocent sounding tweets and Facebook posts become something to worry about. You may think using the word “crap” in a tweet is fine and harmless…but would your mom? Always think twice about everything you post!

Consequences

Realistically, your customers probably won’t call you up crying and telling you how disappointed they are (that is, unless you REALLY mess up). What they’ll do is stop buying your product – which can hurt just as much, if not more!

The idea isn’t to suddenly find out what offends your customers – it’s to be careful what you say in the first place. You don’t want to be on the wrong end of a mass exodus away from your business because of one simple tweet.

If you do slip up and say something ridiculous, then you may have to bite the bullet and apologize. Saying you’re sorry to your mom is always difficult, especially when things really went off the rails. But it’s necessary, and it’s just as necessary that you apologize to your customers if you slip up and offend them!

So say it with me: “Sorry, mom. I promise not to do it again.”

Have you ever slipped up bad enough you had to apologize to your followers or customers?

This article is written by Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases (http://www.ereleases.com), the online leader in affordable press release distribution. Download your free copy of the Beginner’s Guide to Writing Powerful Press Releases here: http://www.ereleases.com/insider/beginnersguide.html

One Response

  1. Prof KRG says:

    I love this. I usually call this the Grandmother Test. In other words, don’t do anything you wouldn’t want your grandma to know you did. My grandmother certainly would tell you if you did!

    Great post.

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